All posts by CharlieLandon

Naples Fishing: Spanish Mackerel, July 22!

Naples Fishing: Please Click For Rates & To Book A Charter Or Call 239-472-8658.

Spanish Mackerel, Sunday, July 22, 2018, Naples Fishing Report & Charters.
Spanish Mackerel, Sunday, July 22, 2018, Naples Fishing Report & Charters.
Naples Fishing Charters, July 22, 2018: Spanish Mackerel, Catch & Release
Naples Fishing: Please Click For Rates & To Book A Charter Or Call 239-472-8658.

Naples Fishing Report, Sunday, July 22, 2018, Florida Fishing Report – Naples: Spanish Mackerel!  Latest Algal Bloom & Water Quality / Lake Okeechobee Update and Red Tide Report.  We’re mostly focused on Naples fishing the channels, grass flats, passes, oyster bars, mangroves and near shore fishing in Naples, but we also give updates on Naples deep sea fishing.

We’re big advocates of catch and release, particularly for snook, but pretty much for most species.  Only take what you are going to eat, and a lot of fish are better off as sport fish, even if they are in season.  Our motto is let ‘em get bigger and catch ‘em again!

Spanish Mackerel, Friday, May 19, 2017, Naples Fishing Report & Charters.
Spanish Mackerel, Friday, May 19, 2017, Naples Fishing Report & Charters.

Please see our SanibelCaptivaFort Myers, and Cuban Fishing sites for charter photos from our other captains, additional fishing and shelling reports, and musings on fishing in Cuba one of these days!

“The Atlantic Spanish mackerel (Scomberomorus maculatus) is a migratory species of mackerels that swims to the Northern Gulf of Mexico in spring, returns to south Florida in the Eastern Gulf, and to Mexico in the Western Gulf in the fall.

The fish exhibits a green back; its sides are silvery marked with about three rows of round to elliptical yellow spots. Lateral line gradually curving down from the upper end of the gill cover toward caudal peduncle. The first (spiny) dorsal fin is black at the front. Posterior membranes are white with a black edge. Its single row of cutting edged teeth in each jaw (around sixty-four teeth in all) are large, uniform, closely spaced and flattened from side to side. As with the King mackerel and the Cero mackerel, these teeth look very similar to those of the BluefishPomatomus saltatrix.

Naples Fishing, Spanish Mackerel, Thursday, 5-5-16, Naples Fishing Report & Charters ~ #Naples.
Naples Fishing, Spanish Mackerel, Thursday, 5-5-16, Naples Fishing Report & Charters ~ #Naples.

Spanish mackerel occur seasonally from the Yucatán peninsula, Mexico, as far north as Cape Cod, Massachusetts. They are a shallow water species, preferring sand bottom in depths of 10 to 40 feet (3 to 12 m), occasionally found as deep as 80 feet (24 m).

Naples Fishing, Spanish Mackerel, Thursday, 2-25-16, Naples Fishing Report & Charters ~ #Naples.
Naples Fishing, Spanish Mackerel, Thursday, 2-25-16, Naples Fishing Report & Charters ~ #Naples.

It appears that one Atlantic and one or more Gulf groups of Spanish mackerel occur in Florida waters. With rising water temperatures, the Atlantic group migrates along the Atlantic coast of the United States from Miami Florida, beginning in late February through July reaching as far as southern Cape Cod, Massachusetts, then returning in fall. An Eastern Gulf group moves northward from the Florida Keys during late winter and spring, appearing off the central West Coast of Florida about April 1. Movement continues westward and terminates along the northern Texas coast. During fall, this group migrates back to its wintering grounds in the Keys.

Naples Fishing, Spanish Mackerel, Monday, 1-18-16, Naples Fishing Report & Charters ~ #Naples.
Naples Fishing, Spanish Mackerel, Monday, 1-18-16, Naples Fishing Report & Charters ~ #Naples.

The Gulf group of Spanish mackerel spawn in batches from May to September off shore of Texas, off the Gulf shore of Florida as early as April in some years. The Atlantic group spawns starting in April off the Carolinas and from late August to late September in the northernmost part of its range. Spanish mackerel mature by age-1 at a fork length (FL) of 14 inches (36 cm). Females live longer and grow to larger sizes than males. Females may live as long as 11 years, growing to 11 pounds (5.0 kg) and 33 inches (84 cm) FL. Males reach about age-6 and 19 inches (48 cm) FL.[3]

Naples Fishing, Kingfish Or King Mackerel, Monday, 12-21-15, Naples Fishing Report & Charters ~ #Naples.
Naples Fishing, Kingfish Or King Mackerel, Monday, 12-21-15, Naples Fishing Report & Charters ~ #Naples.

The Spanish mackerel is also a popular sushi fish. By analogy with the Japanese Spanish mackerel, which is a member of the same genus, it is often called sawara on sushi menus.”  Please see more information here.

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Spanish Mackerel

Image Credit: © Diane Rome Peebles

Spanish Mackerel: Scomberomorous maculatus

Florida Regulations: 

Regulations Gulf State Waters Atlantic State Waters
Minimum Size Limit 12” fork length
Daily Bag Limit 15 per harvester per day

Gear Requirements:

  • Legal Gear: beach or haul seine, cast net, hook and line, spear

State Waters Harvest Seasons

Habitat and Fishing tips:

Spanish mackerel are a pelagic, fast swimming fish that are prevalent throughout Florida’s coastal waters when water temperatures exceed 70 degrees.

To remain in warm water, Spanish mackerel migrate out of the northern parts of the state in the fall of the year and return in April with the warming waters.

Naples Fishing, Spanish Mackerel, Monday, 10-19-15, Naples Fishing Report & Charters ~ #Naples.
Naples Fishing, Spanish Mackerel, Monday, 10-19-15, Naples Fishing Report & Charters ~ #Naples.

Mackerel are frequently found in shallow, clear water over grass beds and along sandy beaches where they feed on schools of baitfish. Spanish mackerel are aggressive feeders that will strike a wide variety of natural and artificial baits, so they can be very easy to catch.

Many anglers identify the location of Spanish mackerel by trolling or watching for birds diving on schools of baitfish, which often indicates that mackerel are forcing the bait to the surface. Angling techniques include trolling or casting with small shiny spoons, dusters or jigs. Light spinning or bait-casting tackle with 10 to 15-pound monofilament line is adequate; however, 30 to 60-pound monofilament leader is required due to the mackerel’s razor-sharp teeth.

State Record:

12 lb, caught near Ft. Pierce

Florida Rule

Gulf Federal Waters Rules

Atlantic Federal Waters Rules

Please see source & more information here.

Naples Fishing, Spanish Mackerel, 3-22-15, Naples Fishing Report & Charters ~ #Naples.
Naples Fishing, Spanish Mackerel, 3-22-15, Naples Fishing Report & Charters ~ #Naples.

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658

The Naples-Marco Island area has terrific beaches and beach fishing!  The beaches stretch along the Gulf of Mexico for about 10 miles and include Delnor-Wiggins Pass State Park, Clam Pass Beach Park, Naples Municipal Beach & Fishing Pier (Naples Pier), Vanderbilt Beach, North Gulfshore Boulevard Beach, and Lowdermilk Beach Park.  Naples beaches are often ranked in the top 5-10 beaches in America!

There are also a number of both small and very large reserves in and nearby Naples-Marco Island.  They include Corkscrew Swamp SanctuaryEverglades National ParkBig Cypress National PreserveFlorida Panther National Wildlife RefugeTen Thousand Islands National Wildlife Refuge, and Picayune Strand State Forest.

Naples Fishing, Spanish Mackerel, 3-17-15, Naples Fishing Report & Charters ~ #Naples.
Naples Fishing, Spanish Mackerel, 3-17-15, Naples Fishing Report & Charters ~ #Naples.

Like much of southwest Florida, Naples has barrier islands which mean great fishing!  The breadth of the natural ecosystem near Naples is immense and can’t be fully described in this short post.  Marco Island is the most well-known, but Marco Island spills south into the Ten Thousand Islands and unbelievably good fishing!

Spanish Mackerel, 2-16-2015, Naples Fishing Report & Charters ~ #Naples.
Spanish Mackerel, 2-16-2015, Naples Fishing Report & Charters ~ #Naples.

Other islands include Keywaydin Island, which is the longest unbridged island in southwest Florida and has a lot of natural habitats, and Kice Island and Cape Romano, which are very remote!

Florida Fishing Report: Red Tide Status, 7-20-18

Florida Fish & Wildlife Red Tide Status: Friday, July 20, 2018

FWC released the Red Tide Status Report this week.

Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission red tide bulletin at 4:25 PM 7/20/2018.

Red Tide Status Report (July 20, 2018)

A patchy bloom of the Florida red tide organism, Karenia brevis, persists in Southwest Florida.

In Southwest Florida over the past week, K. brevis was observed at background to high concentrations in 12 samples collected from Sarasota County, low to high concentrations in 11 samples collected from or offshore of Charlotte County, background to high concentrations in 20 samples collected from or offshore of Lee County, and background to low concentrations in nine samples collected from or offshore of Collier County.

Additional samples collected throughout Florida over the past week did not contain K. brevis.

Southwest Florida Red Tide Status Map, 7-20-18, Courtesy Of FWC, Florida Red Tide Report.
Florida Red Tide Status Map, 7-20-18, Courtesy Of FWC, Florida Red Tide Report.

Over the past week, fish kills were reported in Southwest Florida in Sarasota County (Casperson Beach, Manasota Beach, Nokomis, Siesta Key Beach, Venice Beach, Venice North Jetty), Charlotte County (Lemon Bay, Little Gasparilla Island), Lee County (Boca Grande Beach, Bonita Beach, Bowman’s Beach, near Burnt Store Marina, Captiva Beach, Cayo Costa, Fort Myers Beach, Gasparilla Island, near Laika Lane, Sanibel Beach) and Collier County (Barefoot Beach, South Marco Beach).

Respiratory irritation was reported over the past week in Sarasota County (7/12, 7/16, 7/18-7/19 at Lido Key; 7/12, 7/17-7/18, and 7/20 at Manasota Beach; 7/16 and 7/19-7/20 at Nokomis; 7/16 and 7/18-7/20 at Venice Beach and Venice North Jetty), Lee County (7/19 at Cayo Costa, 7/20 at Gasparilla Island State Park), and Collier County (7/12-7/13 at South Marco Beach).

Forecasts by the USF-FWC Collaboration for Prediction of Red TidesExternal Website for Pinellas to northern Monroe counties predict net southeastern transport of surface and subsurface waters for most areas over the next three days.

For more information, please see FWC.

Key for Results

Description Karenia breviscells/liter Possible Effects (K. brevis only)
NOT PRESENT – BACKGROUND background levels of 1,000 cells or less None anticipated
VERY LOW >1,000 to 10,000 Possible respiratory irritation; shellfish harvesting closures >  5,000 cells/L
LOW >10,000 to 100,000 Respiratory irritation, possible fish kills, and bloom chlorophyll probably detected by satellites at upper limits
MEDIUM >100,000 to 1,000,000 Respiratory irritation and probable fish kills
HIGH >1,000,000 As above plus discoloration

 

“The FWRI Red Tide Status Line is now available to callers throughout the state. FWRI updates the recording each Friday by 5 p.m. Red Tide Status Line: 866-300-9399 (toll-free inside Florida only); 727-552-2448 (outside Florida).

Reports are updated on Friday afternoon except during holidays, in which case the report will be released on the closest day. Additional information, if available, is provided on Wednesday afternoon. To receive an e-mail when the current status has been updated, visit our subscription area.

FWC’s Red Tide Action Report

Red tide is a naturally-occurring microscopic alga that has been documented along Florida’s Gulf Coast since the 1840’s and occurs nearly every year. Blooms, or higher-than-normal concentrations, of the Florida red tide alga, Karenia brevis, frequently occur in the Gulf of Mexico. Red tide begins in the Gulf of Mexico 10 to 40 miles offshore and can be transported inshore by winds and currents.

FWC Actions and Partnerships:

  • FWC operates the toll-free fish kill hotline. To report fish kills, contact the FWC Fish Kill Hotline at 800-636-0511 or submit a report online. Reports from this hotline help FWC researchers track and better understand the impact of red tide in Florida.
  • FWC remains available to local agencies and partners in affected areas, including area business and tourism groups in southwest Florida. Any local agency or group that has any questions or concerns can contact Kelly Richmond from the FWC at 727-502-4784.
  • FWC continues to partner with the Florida Department of Health to advise residents and visitors of any potential health impacts. Residents and visitors can contact the DOH’s aquatic toxin experts at 850-245-4250 or contact their local health department for any concern about health safety.
  • FWC’s Fish and Wildlife Research Institute and Mote Marine Laboratory work together to monitor Karenia brevis. This cooperative effort is designed to help mitigate the adverse impacts of red tide. This joint research program that includes red tide monitoring, research and public outreach and education has resulted in better tools and ongoing monitoring for red tides along the Gulf Coast.
  • In partnership with the FWC, the Collaboration for Prediction of Red Tides (CPR) at the University of South Florida offer a new Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) tracking tool that generates a 3.5-day forecast of the bloom trajectories.
  • To protect public health, FWC’s Fish and Wildlife Research Institute’s Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) group closely monitors the status of K. brevis on Florida’s coasts, providing technical support to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACSExternal Website), the agency that regulates approved shellfish harvesting areas.
  • Since 2000, FWC’s Fish and Wildlife Research Institute established a Red Tide Offshore Monitoring Program, which is a volunteer program for citizens to help collect water samples from routine collection points and sites reported for suspected harmful algal blooms (HABs).The timely sampling by volunteers allows researchers to provide an early warning of offshore algal blooms and investigate reported events as they occur. The Program needs volunteers to collect samples from all coastal Florida counties. To view more information visit, Red Tide Offshore Monitoring Program or use the Volunteer SignUp Form.

Red Tide Resources